Goldenarticles articles

Art in sequence - knowledge

TSUNAMI The Next Big Wave:The Grandaddy of Them All


A few days ago on Melbourne's 60 Minutes, celebrated scientist Dr Kerry Sieh predicted the certain next big wave or giant Tsunami will absolutely happen, and it will be the Grandaddy of them all.Indonesia gets the full force this time about .

How I Became Attracted In Looking At The Moon


Like a lot of kids, my folks gave me a 60mm telescope for Christmas one year. The scope was a archetypal department-store brand - not very good - but to a 12-year old kid it opened up the universe.

51 Easy, Eco-Friendly Ways You Can Help Sustain Earth Earth


1. Air dry your laundry.

Global Dumbing?


I am activation to astonishment if scientists have been receiving it all wrong. All this time, colonize have been anxious about the Ozone, or a giant asteroid, or some breakout of a bio-hazardous agent by a terrorist business being the doom of mankind.

Movin On: Attractive Transhumanism in Stride


Back in the seventies, we watched "The Six Million Buck Man", a accepted small screen show about a skilled agent who was crucially injured and given the gift of technology--bionic legs and super vision.Lee Majors portrayed a man adept of leaping tall buildings and scanning the landscape at night.

Surgical Biomaterials and Bandanna Renaissance Technologies


Plants, invertebrate animals, amphibians and even reptiles have the capacity to rejuvenate lost or dented body parts. In the case of lizards, for example, this is a distrustful mechanism.

The Consider About Cloning


There are two types of cloning. One involves harvesting stem cells from embryos ("therapeutic cloning").

Eugenics and the Expectations of the Human Species


"It is clear that advanced medicine has bent a critical dilemma ..

Treating Ever-present Mutational Hepatitis B with Chinese Medicine Vitalliver (Vigconic Suppositories)


Research Method:Quantitative determination by divergent HBV-DNA of cases ahead of and after the treatment.Number of cases: 25 (n)Case Selection: Among the age of 16 and 65, in accordance with the diagnosis values pf constant Hepatitis B, with destructive e antigen and categorical e antibody, HBV-DNA > 1×104 cp/mL.

What are GE and GMO Crops?


Genetically Engineered Organisms and Genetically Customized Organisms, with Monsanto Corporation in the front of development. GE crops, counting cord seeds, have genetically bespoke properties with built-in resistance to herbicides and insects (Bt cotton), and are also called Frankencotton.

Tsunami warnings by 2006


Experts from the United Nations and Indian Ocean countries approved to set up a tsunami advice arrangement to foil a recap of the devastation that struck on December 26, Unesco said.A fully functioning arrangement that detects underwater earthquakes and broadcasts warnings to coastal communities is likely to be in place by the end of 2006, said Patricio Bernal, executive escritoire of Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, on Tuesday.

What is Dowsing?


Dowsing is absolutely an intuitive art and one of the oldest forms of foresight in the world. Perchance the oldest and most customary image we have a dowser is what is called a field or map dowser.

Electrical Industrys Armor - Destruction for Good


Destruction! Blow Up! Eliminate! These are not amiable words!Unfortunately, when it comes to protection we have no other choices. In the electrical industry, fuses are ruined in order to protect lives or property.

Troubleshooting Pump Harms the Easy Way


In any conundrum analysis, we have to give the problem, check whether there is any deviation from the average condition, identify the achievable causes, evaluate the doable causes and then back up the true cause.Pumps or other machinery will give tell tale signs when they are not running properly.

Energy Aware and Waste Wise


Constantly bombarded with denial in order about the environment, finances and accepted resources? Atmosphere overwhelmed? Each and every one of us can do amazing to help our world - opening right where we are, right now. Though not all and sundry can give to donate cash or time to a cause, there are endless tactics that will cut an individual's input to the landfill and their supply consumption.

More Articles from Discipline Information:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19


MORE RESOURCES:

Nail Art Gets A Scientific Makeover On Instagram: @nailsciart : Goats and Soda  NPR

A young scientist decided that one way to get girls into science would be by painting neurons and parasitic worms on her nails.


The case for strategic and managed climate retreat  Science Magazine

Faced with global warming, rising sea levels, and the climate-related extremes they intensify, the question is no longer whether some communities will ...


A new book explores the ways that humans could go extinct  Science News

A new book looks at the threats that could wipe out humankind and what can be done to counteract them.


Scientists say sustainable forestry organizations should lift ban on biotech trees  Science Magazine

Look at anything made from trees—a ream of paper, a cardboard box, lumber—and it's probably stamped with the logo of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) ...


Programmable CRISPR-responsive smart materials  Science Magazine

CRISPR technology is best known as a gene editing tool. English et al. developed a group of stimuli-responsive hydrogels to respond to the programmable ...


Science breakthrough after researchers major discovery could lead to unhackable internet  Express.co.uk

Researchers have teleported 3D information, the most complex ever transferred, after a major breakthrough. Scientists have previously been able to only send ...


This Week in Science  Science Magazine

Photograph of the surface of (162173) Ryugu, taken at night by the MASCOT camera. PHOTO: MASCOT/DLR/JAXA. In October 2018, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft ...


Science briefs: How sharks glow deep in the ocean  Minneapolis Star Tribune

About 1,000 to 2,000 feet in the sea is a place where only blue beams in sunlight can penetrate. This is the home of the swell shark and chain catshark. Look at ...


Funding crisis at Brazilian science agency could leave 80000 researchers and students without pay  Science Magazine

A major budget crisis at Brazil's leading science funding agency could disrupt the lives of thousands of students and early-career scientists. In September, the ...


Flashing Neurons, Invisible Moonlight and Adorable Squid Babies: The Week's Best Science GIFs  Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the ...


Ultrafast laser welding of ceramics  Science Magazine

Laser welding is an integral part of modern manufacturing, but it fractures ceramic materials. Penilla et al. developed two methods for welding ceramics using ...


AAAS names chemist Holden Thorp as editor-in-chief of Science  Science Magazine

Holden Thorp, a chemist who held top leadership positions at two major U.S. research universities, was named today as the next editor-in-chief of the Science ...


My younger sister died by suicide. Can science succeed in helping others?  Science Magazine

When my younger sister died by suicide 7 years ago, at age 30, the loss was shattering. If I considered the role of science at all, it was through the lens of ...


Persistence of neuronal representations through time and damage in the hippocampus  Science Magazine

How does the brain store information over a long period of time? Gonzalez et al. chronically implanted custom-built high-sensitivity microendoscopes and ...


Could texting be making us worse at understanding science?  WHYY

Texting and other e-device usage could make our brains worse at understanding science, according to a new study by Penn State researchers. “We found that ...


A Cosmic Rarity Found in Antarctic Snow  The Atlantic

The isotope iron-60, produced when a star explodes, is hidden in some of Earth's most isolated places.


Abortion Bans Based on So-Called "Science" Are Fraudulent  Scientific American

We are scientists, and we believe that evidence, not ideology, should inform health care decisions. The wave of anti-abortion laws across the U.S. is the latest in ...


A roadmap for malaria research  Science Magazine

Although malaria is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases worldwide, causing almost half a million deaths from 219 million cases annually (1), the ...


Marijuana is getting more popular in America while cocaine declines  Science News

In 2006, drug users spent more on cocaine than on heroin, marijuana or methamphetamine. By 2016, marijuana expenditures had exceeded the other drugs.


Amazon Fires and the Horrifying Science of Deforestation  WIRED

At the core of Brazil's out-of-control fires in the Amazon is deforestation. Here's how human meddling fundamentally transforms a rainforest.


Suicide attempts are hard to anticipate. A study that tracks teens' cellphone use aims to change that  Science Magazine

Researchers hope mobile devices can capture signs of imminent risk that a doctor's questionnaire can't.


Suicide—turning the tide  Science Magazine

Suicide is a devastating public health problem, afflicting individuals, families, and societies. Fortunately, continuous striving by the World Health Organization to ...


The 200-year effort to see the embryo  Science Magazine

The year 2018 was a watershed moment for the science of embryos. Building on the recent development of single-cell transcriptomic approaches, time-resolved, ...


Public trust that scientists work for the good of society is growing  Science News

More Americans trust the motives of scientists than of journalists or politicians.


Probing an evolutionary riddle  Science Magazine

A startling evolutionary hypothesis considers why humans harm themselves—and how they've kept themselves safe for millennia. Embedded Image.


Scientists Start Building a Parts List for the Brain  Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the ...


'The system is swamped.' Canada can't keep up with requests to study cannabis  Science Magazine

The Canadian government is scrambling to respond to a glut of license applications for cannabis research prompted by the drug's legalization in October 2018.


Paths out of darkness  Science Magazine

A Science special package explores how researchers are tackling the devastating public health challenge of suicide. Embedded Image. At a suicide prevention ...


Scientists may have spotted a black hole and a neutron star colliding  Science Magazine

Gravitational-wave hunters may have spotted their most exotic quarry yet. On 14 August at 5:10:39 p.m. EDT, a trio of gigantic detectors in the United States and ...


Daily briefing: How to communicate your science to the people in charge  Nature.com

Six simple strategies for informing policymakers, researchers speak about life in a troubled ancient-DNA lab and the 'CRISPR age' spawns smart materials.


Climate misinformation may be thriving on YouTube, a social scientist warns  Science News

Analyzing 200 climate-related videos on YouTube shows that a majority challenge widely accepted views about climate change and climate engineering.


Here's what Earth might look like to aliens  Science Magazine

Astronomers reverse engineer Earth images to understand data from exoplanets.


The physics professor who says online extremists act like curdled milk  The Guardian

Hate may be less like a cancer and more like bubbles, says Neil Johnson, who applies physics theory to human behavior.


We Could Detect Extraterrestrials Because They May Glow, Scientists Say  Livescience.com

Extraterrestrial life could glow in spectacular reds and greens. Why? To shield itself from punishing flares of UV radiation.


Emails Reveal Science Publisher Found Papers On Herbicide Safety Should Be Retracted Due to Monsanto Meddling - US Right to Know  U.S. Right to Know

Secretive influence by Monsanto in a set of papers published in the scientific journal Critical Reviews in Toxicology was so unethical that an investigation by the ...


The science of addiction: a personal struggle to kick cocaine gives a neuroscientist unique insights  The Guardian

Having survived a decade of drink and drugs as a young woman, Professor Judith Grisel focused all her determination on writing a book about addiction.


Reducing the metabolic rate of walking and running with a versatile, portable exosuit  Science Magazine

Walking and running require different gaits, with each type of motion putting a greater bias on different muscles and joints. Kim et al. developed a soft, fully ...


NAD+ cleavage activity by animal and plant TIR domains in cell death pathways  Science Magazine

One way that plants respond to pathogen infection is by sacrificing the infected cells. The nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat immune receptors responsible ...


Primordial and recycled helium isotope signatures in the mantle transition zone  Science Magazine

Helium isotopes provide a window into the very deepest and oldest parts of Earth's voluminous mantle. However, several processes tend to obscure the helium ...


An Illinois patient’s death may be the first in the U.S. tied to vaping  Science News

The death of an Illinois resident may be the first in the United States linked to vaping, state health officials announced August 23. The adult was among 193 ...


This rocky 'super-Earth' may be a hard place for life to get a foothold  Science Magazine

When scientists go looking for life on distant exoplanets, they generally focus on rocky worlds the size of Earth. But most of these so-called super-Earths orbit, not ...


Specialized cutaneous Schwann cells initiate pain sensation  Science Magazine

Pain has been thought to be initiated by activation of free nerve endings without end organs in the skin. In contrast to this paradigm, Abdo et al. discovered a ...


Maker Faire Tulsa showcases technology, science and more  kjrh.com

TULSA, Okla. — Maker Faire Tulsa is underway at the Tulsa Expo Square's Central Park Hall. This award-winning event showcases invention and creativity in ...


Infected travelers reveal Cuba's 'hidden' Zika outbreak  Science Magazine

As Zika virus raced through the Americas and the Caribbean in 2015 and 2016, it infected an estimated 800,000 people and left nearly 4000 newborns with ...


No coding required: Companies make it easier than ever for scientists to use artificial intelligence  Science Magazine

Yang-Hui He, a mathematical physicist at the University of London, is an expert in string theory, one of the most abstruse areas of physics. But when it comes to ...


Nearly ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductivity  Science Magazine

In conventional, and in many unconventional, superconductors, the electrons that form Cooper pairs have spins pointing in opposite directions. An applied ...


China's scientists alarmed, bewildered by growing anti-Chinese sentiment in the United States  Science Magazine

SHANGHAI, CHINA—Scientists in China are concerned about what they see as growing anti-Chinese sentiment in the United States. They dismiss claims of a ...


Vanishing Arctic ice will open the way for more science voyages, analysis suggests  Science Magazine

Early this month, the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Healy embarked on a journey through the Arctic seas off of the coast of Alaska, helping researchers conduct ...


Reuters Science News Summary  Yahoo News

Following is a summary of current science news briefs. Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first time. Scientists in Florida have artificially ...


Francis's way  Science Magazine

For a decade, Francis Collins has shielded the National Institutes of Health—while making waves of his own. Embedded Image. Francis Collins has led the ...


Drinking fluoridated water during pregnancy may lower IQ in sons, controversial study says  Science Magazine

But critics say the results are “barely statistically significant”


Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database  Nature.com

Some highly cited academics seem to be heavy self-promoters — but researchers warn against policing self-citation.


When science was groovy  Science Magazine

In the days leading up to Woodstock, posters and advertisements pronounced the music festival—held 50 years ago on 15 to 18 August 1969—as an “Aquarian ...


IIT Students Clean Up 31st Street Beach For Science And Service  CBS Chicago

CHICAGO (CBS) — Some South Side college students learned a valuable environmental lesson outside of the classroom Saturday. More than 100 students and ...


We Need a New Science of Progress  The Atlantic

In 1861, the American scientist and educator William Barton Rogers published a manifesto calling for a new kind of research institution. Recognizing the “daily ...


Scientists Have Been Underestimating the Pace of Climate Change  Scientific American

Recently, the U.K. Met Office announced a revision to the Hadley Center historical analysis of sea surface temperatures (SST), suggesting that the oceans have ...


Cortical layer–specific critical dynamics triggering perception  Science Magazine

How are behaviorally relevant representations of the outside world initiated and manifested in the mammalian brain? Marshel et al. combined a ...


Cataclysmic collision could explain Jupiter's fuzzy core  Science Magazine

Jupiter harbors a deep mystery: Rather than the distinct core scientists expected, it has a fuzzy center, according to recent observations by NASA's Juno ...


Scientists discover new pain-sensing organ  The Guardian

A new organ involved in the sensation of pain has been discovered by scientists, raising hopes that it could lead to the development of new painkilling drugs.


Emergent ferromagnetism near three-quarters filling in twisted bilayer graphene  Science Magazine

When two layers of graphene in a bilayer are twisted with respect to each other by just the right, “magic,” angle, the electrons in the system become strongly ...


Sites grounded in science to visit across the US  Washington Post

We visited locations that reveal the beauty, mystery, wildness and audacity of science.


Mystery solved? Why cats eat grass  Science Magazine

Cats do a lot of weird things. One of the biggies is eating grass, often to throw it up just a few minutes later. Now, after perhaps centuries of mystery, scientists ...


Ancient Skeletons with Alien-Like Heads Unearthed in Croatia  Livescience.com

Archaeologists have unearthed three ancient skeletons in Croatia — and two of them had pointy, artificially deformed skulls.


Ionic liquid–based click-ionogels  Science Advances

Gels that are freeze-resistant and heat-resistant and have high ultimate tensile strength are desirable in practical applications owing to their potential in ...


White and wonderful? Microplastics prevail in snow from the Alps to the Arctic  Science Advances

Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous, and considerable quantities prevail even in the Arctic; however, there are large knowledge gaps regarding pathways to the ...


Chemists have created and imaged a new form of carbon  Science News

An elusive wreath of carbon has made its long-awaited debut. Scientists created a molecule called cyclocarbon and imaged its structure, describing the ring of ...


The global soil community and its influence on biogeochemistry  Science Magazine

Soils harbor a rich diversity of invertebrate and microbial life, which drives biogeochemical processes from local to global scales. Relating the biodiversity ...


Antarctica scientists ‘blown out of water’ by bizarre creature: ‘Can’t explain it’  Express.co.uk

ANTARCTICA scientists were left stumped when they discovered a unique creature at the bottom of the ocean, a documentary showed.


NASA bombshell: Agency chief reveals nuclear ‘game changer’  Express.co.uk

NASA's administrator has described plans by the agency, the China National Space Administration and Russia's Roscosmos to develop rockets powered by ...


The Solar System's Loneliest Planets, Revisited  Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the ...


Scientists share new details about mysterious 'ghost particle'  CNN

Neutrinos, so-called "ghost particles" scattered across the universe, can be 10 million times lighter than the mass of an electron, according to a new study.


Middle Stone Age foragers resided in high elevations of the glaciated Bale Mountains, Ethiopia  Science Magazine

Recent archaeological research has produced evidence of the earliest human occupation of high-altitude habitats in the Andes and the Tibetan Plateau.


A three-dimensional map of the Milky Way using classical Cepheid variable stars  Science Magazine

Cepheid variable stars pulsate, which allows their distances to be determined from the periodic variations in brightness. Skowron et al. constructed a catalog of ...


'Mystery' volcano that cooled the ancient world traced to El Salvador  Science Magazine

The sixth century was a rough time to be alive: Lower-than-average temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere triggered crop failure, famine, and maybe even ...


Increased atmospheric vapor pressure deficit reduces global vegetation growth  Science Advances

Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is a critical variable in determining plant photosynthesis. Synthesis of four global climate datasets reveals a sharp ...


Scientists seek materials that defy friction at the atomic level  Science News

Scientists investigate superslippery materials and other unusual friction feats.


Exploring genetic interaction manifolds constructed from rich single-cell phenotypes  Science Magazine

Mapping of genetic interactions (GIs) is usually based on cell fitness as the phenotypic readout, which obscures the mechanistic origin of interactions. Norman et ...


LIGO and Virgo probably spotted the first black hole swallowing up a neutron star  Science News

In a first, astronomers may just have detected gravitational waves from a black hole merging with a neutron star.


“Our religion will not clash with or contradict the facts of science in any particular.”  Patheos

"Our religion will not clash with or contradict the facts of science in any particular. You may take geology, for instance, and it is a true science; not that I would say ...


An ecologist with an eye toward forecasting the future  Science Magazine

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY—The ultimate goal of many biologists is to be able to predict how their system—be it a genome, a cell, an organism, or an entire ...


Telescopes in Hawaii reopen after deal with protesters  Science Magazine

Astronomers at the 12 observatories atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii returned to work on 10 August, after a deal was made with protesters blocking construction of the ...


Scientists Grew a Mysterious Life Form That Could Reveal The Origins of Complex Life  ScienceAlert

When scientists ran DNA analysis on a sediment core taken from the floor of the Arctic ocean back in 2010, they found something surprising. A previously ...


Somatic evolution and global expansion of an ancient transmissible cancer lineage  Science Magazine

Canine transmissible venereal tumor is one of the few cancer lineages that is transferred among individuals through contact. It arose millennia ago and has ...


A greener path for the EU Common Agricultural Policy  Science Magazine

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) of the European Union (EU) is one of the world's largest agricultural policies and the EU's longest-prevailing one.


Amazon Deforestation and Brazilian President Bolsonaro's Attack on Science  Union of Concerned Scientists

Science is always a potential threat to authoritarian rulers, because it uncovers truths that contradict their lies. Recently we've seen a dramatic example of this ...


Space telescope would turn Earth into a giant magnifying lens  Science Magazine

Proposed “Terrascope” could gather light from small exoplanets with the power of a 150-meter mirror.


The Charlotte Hornets should become a basketball science experience  SB Nation

The Hornets are going to be bad this NBA season. Why not be interesting?


Today's leaders in business and science don't have all the answers to humankind's biggest challenges  The National

There is a hunger for alternative solutions to the world's problems.


Black carbon lofts wildfire smoke high into the stratosphere to form a persistent plume  Science Magazine

Extensive and intense wildfires in the Pacific Northwest of the United States in 2017 injected large quantities of smoke into the stratosphere. Yu et al. used ...


Climate expert at CDC poised to file whistleblower complaint over treatment  Science Magazine

George Luber not allowed in office without armed escort.


3D bioprinting of collagen to rebuild components of the human heart  Science Magazine

3D bioprinting is still a fairly new technique that has been limited in terms of resolution and by the materials that can be printed. Lee et al. describe a 3D printing ...


The untold story of the 'circle of trust' behind the world's first gene-edited babies  Science Magazine

This story, one in a series, was supported by the Pulitzer Center. On 10 June 2017, a sunny and hot Saturday in Shenzhen, China, two couples came to the ...


Department of Energy to Provide $27.6 Million for Data Science Research in Chemical and Materials Sciences  Energy.gov

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $27.6 million in funding over the next three years for targeted research in data ...


Europe's record heat melted Swiss glaciers  Science Magazine

Originally published by E&E News. The sweltering heat wave that roasted much of Europe last month has since moved north, where it's wreaking havoc on the ...


Communicating science to policymakers: six strategies for success  Nature.com

Scientists can improve how they inform politicians and other policymakers on how to make decisions, say Hannah Safford and Austin Brown.


Alzheimer’s targets brain cells that help people stay awake  Science News

Alzheimer's disease destroys command centers in the brain that keep people awake. That finding could explain why the disease often brings daytime ...


A single fast radio burst localized to a massive galaxy at cosmological distance  Science Magazine

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are flashes of radio emission from distant astronomical sources. Two FRBs are known to have repeated, but most last just a few ...


The sourdough loaves that led two scientists to fame on The Great British Bake Off  Nature.com

The UK television competition, which has spawned spin-offs in 30 other countries, is back for a tenth series, starting on 27 August. The 2018 winner Rahul ...


‘Crazy cat ladies’ do not exist, scientists say  The Independent

The stereotypical “cat lady” does not really exist, a new study suggests. Scientists investigating people's emotional responses to “distress vocalisations” in cats ...


Slow-motion video reveals how ants deliver their painful venom  Science Magazine

Painful encounters with ants don't stem from their bite; it's their venom-delivering stingers. Now, in a video posted online this week, a researcher has recorded ...


Developed by:
home | site map
goldenarticles.net © 2019